New Abolitionists Radio: Renewing Hope For The Enslaved Through Slavery Abolition


Today is the May 23rd, 2018 broadcast of New Abolitionists Radio in the last month of our 6th season.

• On and near this day in history.

1- In 1988, the South African government, under a UN-brokered peace initiative, finally agreed to give up control of Namibia. And on 21 March 1990, Namibia was granted its independence.

2- Mar 7, through– Mar 21, 1965. The Selma to Montgomery marches were three protest marches, held in 1965, along with the 54-mile highway from Selma, Alabama to the state capital of Montgomery

3- March 28th, 1799. New York state passed a law for gradual abolition; after that date, children born to slave mothers were free but required to work for the mother’s master for an extended period as indentured servants into their late twenties. Existing slaves kept their status. All remaining slaves were allegedly freed on July 4, 1827.

4- And finally, on March 28th, in 1804, “Black Laws” were enacted in the state of Ohio. The Congress of the Buckeye state became the first legislative body in the country to enact Black Laws, intended to restrict the rights of free blacks. Two groups supported the measure: white settlers from Kentucky and Virginia, and a growing group of businessmen who had ties to southern slavery. All of them despised blacks. The legislation forced blacks and mulattoes to furnish certificates of freedom from a court in the United States before they could settle in Ohio. All black residents had to register with the names of their children by June 1, 1805. The registration fee was 12 and a half cents per name. It became a punishable offense to employ a black person who could not present a certificate of freedom. Anyone harboring or helping fugitive slaves was fined $1,000, with the informer receiving half of the fine. On January 25, 1807, these laws were toughened and other states followed Ohio’s lead. The Black Laws remained in effect until 1849.

• Tonight promises to be brilliant, historic and inspiring. Our guest is Christopher Scott an exoneree, President, and Founder of House of Renewed Hope. A non-profit organization dedicated to working to exonerate wrongfully convicted prisoners.

Christopher Scott was wrongfully convicted of capital murder in 1997 and spent 13 years in prison as an innocent man. Since his release, he has dedicated his life to helping exonerate other wrongfully convicted prisoners.

We’re also expecting a call from Dr. Will Boyd. The Democratic nominee for the office of Lieutenant Governor of Alabama. And finally, we’re also expecting a call from the president of Decarcerate Louisiana, brother Mratibu.

In direct action news

• Again, we want to remind you about a Call for a #Juneteenth 2018 Mobilization Against Prison Slavery from SPARC This year. Supporters of #OperationPUSH, are calling on all opponents of mass incarceration and modern-day slavery internationally to honor the Juneteenth holiday (Tuesday, June 19, 2018) with community organizing and direct action.

• Another reminder. A NATIONWIDE prison slave labor work strike is being called for on August 21st through September 9th. Angola Prison has already begun. If you know someone inside, tell them what’s going on.

We’ll cover what news articles we can in the allotted time. But today is mainly about this discussion on modern legalized slavery from among disparate quarters.

• Our abolitionist in profile tonight is Mum Bett, aka Elizabeth Freeman. Whose case showing Massachusetts’ constitution nullified any previous laws supporting slavery was able to win her freedom and compensation.

• Our Rider of the 21st-century Underground Railroad Corey Williams who was ordered released from a Louisiana prison Monday after serving more than 20 years for a murder many believe he did not commit.

Be sure to follow the information on our FB page at New Abolitionists radio as we talk about the stories and also support our efforts by joining the community.blacktalkradionetwork.com and finding the links on our Abolitionists Planning Page. So, let’s get started.

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